Can Technology Make the University Obsolete?, New Service Allows K-12 Students to Create Lesson Plans: Today’s EdTech News

Welcome to your Wednesday edition of our daily news roundup! Each day on Technapex, we’ll be assembling and posting the top edtech news of the week to keep you in the loop of all things education and technology related. To stay updated on our edtech news, make sure to follow us on Twitter: @Technapex.

Higher Ed

Why Gamification Is Winning Points on Campus – EdTech Magazine

  • Jennifer Zaino discusses the recent expansion of educational gamification intohigher ed institutions. RIT’s MAGIC center aims to use games to educate college students about the realities of loans and student debt in a fresh and entertaining platform.

No More Double-Spending – Inside Higher Ed

  • Ry Rivard shares Stanford University’s push to end unnecessary student spending. Many students were found to be spending unnecessary money on resources published for free online by the university, the issue SIPX looks to correct.

Higher Education in the 21st Century: Is the Classroom Obsolete? – The Huffington Post

  • Angel Cabrera and Callie Le Renard discuss the impacts that education technology and online learning will have on the future of higher education. With the conversion from brick and mortar to virtual classrooms, students will find themselves with increased resources and less in-person instruction, while colleges will have to adopt new business models in order to remain financially sustainable.


More schools use cellphones as learning tools – USA TODAY

  • Josh Higgins discusses the implementation of cellphones and other portable devices within the classroom. By using the phones in constructive ways, students are more excited to learn as teachers use the new technology to employ more creative lesson plans.

Activate Instruction Puts Students in the Driver’s Seat – EdSurge

  • Christina Quattrocchi reports on Activate Instruction’s latest initiative to put students in control of the lesson plan. Through their new online resources, students can create their own “playlists” to work through at their own pace, and are able to collaborate with their classmates in the virtual environment to complete educational tasks.

A new class of education start-up – Financial Times

  • Philip Broughton shares the story of Stephanie Dua, an edtech entrepreneur who used to be responsible for raising funds for the New York public schooling system. Dua’s shift from the public to the private education sector may signal the imminent shift away toward greater tech implementation within classrooms.

15 startups graduate from DreamIt Ventures’ NYC summer class – VentureBeat

  • Devindra Hardawar provides coverage of DreamIt Ventures’ Demo Day for edtech startups. He gives brief summaries of the accelerator’s companies, and is continually updating the article as he encounters more startups worth mentioning.