AppoLearning Weeds Out Educational Apps That “Stink”

As any parent or teacher who has searched the app store for quality educational genericviagra4sexlife.com apps knows, it can be tough generic-cialis4health.com to weed out the truly useful apps from the games that simply slap some math facts alongside colorful cartoons and characters — in other words, apps that “stink,” as managing how long viagra take effect editor of Appolicious Brad Spirrison put it: “My son was born about a month before the debut of the iPad, and has quite literally grown up alongside touchscreen devices,” he wrote. “As a parent and longtime app reviewer, I can tell you with conviction that most educational apps for the iPad stink.”

This is why the popular app discovery website Appolicious came out with a new directory called appoLearning, a website that highlights the best educational iPad apps as evaluated by education experts, and effectively weeds out the stinkers. Spirrison wrote a blog post this week explaining why Appolicious saw the need to create appoLearning: “While there are countless educational apps that claim to teach my son how to do things like count, trace letters, or identify his home state on a map, the vast majority fail to deliver on what is promised in their iTunes descriptions,” Spirrison wrote.

He lists multiple reasons why finding quality educational apps can be difficult. For one, teachers and parents have to dig through a disorganized app store that makes it difficult to discover apps made for specific grade levels or subjects. Reviews often don’t delve deep enough into the lessons educational apps present, so parents and teachers are often unclear on exactly what their child is learning. Finally, app creators and app reviewers often don’t have the educational expertise necessary to know what material within an app is relevant for students.

AppoLearning attempted to solve these issues by hiring education experts to evaluate apps and create a comprehensive directory of the top apps on the market. These experts include teachers, administrators, educational consultants, and technology specialists who organized the content into relevant categories and explained to parents and teachers if the apps showcased are worth buying and why.

The new generic-cialis4health.com website divides the apps into easily searchable categories, meeting the needs of parents and teachers alike who want to find relevant apps by subject or age group. Age groups are divided into “Early Childhood,” “Elementary School,” “Middle School,” and “High School,” and within each age group are various subjects, such as “ABCs & Phonics,” “Social bph cialis dosage Interaction,” and “Number Sense” for preschoolers and below, “Reading & Books,” “Operations,” and “Life Science,” for elementary school students, “Writing & Composition,” “Algebra,” and “Computer Science & Technology” for middle school students, and “Civics & Government,” “World Languages,” and “Calculus” for high school students. If users can’t find a category they’re looking for, they can request that appoLearning create a new category for a particular subject or grade level.

AppoLearning doesn’t stop at listing the best educational apps, however — they go a step further by providing “Report Cards” for parents and teachers that give the apps a score based on educational content, kid appeal, assessment, features and design, value, and viagra online canada mastercard safety and privacy, so parents and teachers can make the most informed decisions possible.

Teachers, parents, have you given appoLearning a try yet? Share your impressions with us in the comments below, or tweet them to @Technapex or @ce_doyle.

 

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Caity Doyle

Caity is a former English teacher and the editor of Technapex. Caity is extremely passionate about education and is TriplePoint PR's resident edtech expert. When not researching education policy and edtech, she enjoys running along the Bay Trail while blaring the Boss through her headphones, watching the Giants beat the Dodgers, and meeting fellow Italians in North Beach.

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About Caity Doyle

Caity is a former English teacher and the editor of Technapex. Caity is extremely passionate about education and is TriplePoint PR's resident edtech expert. When not researching education policy and edtech, she enjoys running along the Bay Trail while blaring the Boss through her headphones, watching the Giants beat the Dodgers, and meeting fellow Italians in North Beach.