Understanding Dyslexia with “Try Being Me”

Yesterday CBBC, the BBC site for children, featured a special series called My Dyslexic Mind on their Newsround blog. The series was directed toward students in an effort to educate them about the learning disability. Newsround also posted a guide to dyslexia for those students who may feel overwhelmed by the disability or for those who don’t fully understand it.

In an effort to help other students walk in the shoes of peers with dyslexia, CBBC created an interactive experience called “Try Being Me.” The game simulates the experiences of having dyslexia. The program shows videos of real students with dyslexia, and then launches into a series of challenging reading and memory puzzles that present useful analogies to the challenges readers with dyslexia face. If you give up on the puzzle, the game reminds you that if you have dyslexia, you can’t give up, no matter how frustrated you are.

“I honestly believe that Try Being Me will be one of the most important pieces of interactive content we will launch on CBBC in 2013,” said CBBC executive producer Japhet Asher in a press release. “We all need a little help sometimes. And help begins with understanding. If Try Being Me succeeds in helping even one of our audience better understand how it feels to be living with dyslexia, and better understand a friend or classmate as a result, then that’s a great start.” Read the full press release here.

CBBC does an excellent job of conveying the challenges students with dyslexia face, and does so with compassion. Features such as CBBC’s, as well as tools such as special type fonts designed to make letter easier to differentiate for students with dyslexia, are effective at helping both students and adults understand the learning disability better.

Caity Doyle

Caity is a former English teacher and the editor of Technapex. Caity is extremely passionate about education and is TriplePoint PR's resident edtech expert. When not researching education policy and edtech, she enjoys running along the Bay Trail while blaring the Boss through her headphones, watching the Giants beat the Dodgers, and meeting fellow Italians in North Beach.

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About Caity Doyle

Caity is a former English teacher and the editor of Technapex. Caity is extremely passionate about education and is TriplePoint PR's resident edtech expert. When not researching education policy and edtech, she enjoys running along the Bay Trail while blaring the Boss through her headphones, watching the Giants beat the Dodgers, and meeting fellow Italians in North Beach.
  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1658785391 Colin Bowman

    I look forward to the day when our understanding of and approach to being and acting dyslexically sees us no longer viewing dyslexia as either a disability or a specifically learning disability. Being dyslexic, it seems to me, is a difference rather than a disability. It’s good that we have the means to communicate to others who are not dyslexic, what is involved in being dyslexic. Its good that we can think and talk about the life-challenges encountered in being dyslexic. It is true that dyslexic learning is distinctive. But framing all that in terms of disability rather than difference, brings complex discrimination into play. I want to affirm being dyslexic. Want to feel good about being dyslexic. Want to contribute and be valued across what my dyslexic capabilities make possible. Language is important. I think that language which views core-features of people in terms of deficits, leaves things not as good as they need to get.