Thoughts on Tech Education from 8 Entrepreneurs in Tech

This week, TNW’s Scott Gerber of Entrepreneur asked eight tech entrepreneurs an important question about how teachers and administrators can help facilitate technology education so that today’s students are better prepared to meet the need for tech employees in the workforce. He asked, “How should tech education (formal and informal) change to keep pace with business’ growing technology needs?”

Eight tech entrepreneurs weighed in, suggesting ideas for tactics, classes, and lesson plans on incorporating technology education into the curriculum. We’ve shared excerpts from their answers below, and encourage you to check out Gerber’s article, “8 Entrepreneur’s Opinions on Tech Education Options Available Today” at TNW.

1. “Teach Some Curiosity” – Doreen Bloch, Poshly, Inc.

“Tech education within and outside of the classroom should focus on encouraging all people to have a robust interest in technology tools and applications. We need to create more early adopters — being excited about trying technology is the first step.”

2. “More Practice, Less Theory” – Nathan Lustig, Entrustet

“I want students to be playing with technology — using it, finding out what they like, what they don’t like. Get their creativity started and they’ll come up with ideas on how they can improve technology.”

3. “Emphasize Projects in Education” – Thursday Bram, Hyper Modern Consulting

“Technology changes too quickly for curricula… to keep pace. But by assigning practice projects…we can let students find their own way to get something done. It’s necessary to point students towards resources, but it isn’t always necessary to choose tools for them.”

4. “Technical Meets Business” – Logan Lenz, Endagon

“Teaching business/marketing to web engineers is vital. Additionally, business executives or marketers in the tech space should learn the basics of web development.”

5. “Simulated Situations Work” – Justin Beegel, Infographic World, Inc.

“[For a class

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I took,] we had to build a website, and promote it without spending any money. This opened my world to social media and its impact on business…Force [students] to discover the technologies of the time, adapt with them and then learn to apply.”

6. “Progressive Formal Learning” – Brent Beshore, AdVentures

“Every elementary school student should learn the basics of computer programming. Every middle school student should be exploring different coding languages. Every high school student should be building product.”

7. “More Doing, Less ‘Instructions’” – Lucas Sommer, Audimated

“Your education should be tied to dealing with new technologies and getting your hands dirty with trial and error….The real learning comes from doing and creating your own solutions.”

8. “A Little Bit of Liberal Arts” – Aaron Schwartz, Modify Watches

“A great developer can build anything. The next step is being able to do creative analysis of complex problems, particularly those in business. Beyond teaching technical skills, a developer’s education should teach empathy, opportunity recognition and deep strategy.”

 

Caity Doyle

Caity is a former English teacher and the editor of Technapex. Caity is extremely passionate about education and is TriplePoint PR's resident edtech expert. When not researching education policy and edtech, she enjoys running along the Bay Trail while blaring the Boss through her headphones, watching the Giants beat the Dodgers, and meeting fellow Italians in North Beach.

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About Caity Doyle

Caity is a former English teacher and the editor of Technapex. Caity is extremely passionate about education and is TriplePoint PR's resident edtech expert. When not researching education policy and edtech, she enjoys running along the Bay Trail while blaring the Boss through her headphones, watching the Giants beat the Dodgers, and meeting fellow Italians in North Beach.