The Scoop

Haven’t been keeping up with your edtech news lately? Fear not! Technapex presents “The Scoop,” our new roundup of interesting #edtech articles that look good enough to Tweet.

“Is Algebra Necessary?”
To the delight of high school and college students everywhere, Andrew Hacker raises the question expressed in the headline of this New York Times op-ed. “Nor is it clear that the math we learn in the classroom has any relation to the quantitative reasoning we need on the job,” Hacker writes. “John P. Smith III, an educational psychologist at Michigan State University who has studied math education, has found that ‘mathematical reasoning in workplaces differs markedly from the algorithms taught in school.’ Even in jobs that rely on so-called STEM credentials — science, technology, engineering, math — considerable training occurs after hiring, including the kinds of computations that will be required.”

“Let’s Get to the Bottom of #Edtech Hysteria”
Teacher educator and former elementary school teacher Shaun Johnson posts to HuffPost’s education blog, addressing “#edtech” hype. He raises an important issue: “There’s an underlying ‘disruptive’ strain to #edtech that is, from my perspective, disconcerting. It seems that certain proponents of #edtech are pushing technology in order to completely ‘teacher-proof’ the classroom.”

“Are Teachers Lazy?”
As a former teacher I object to the sensational headline, but the information is interesting. Wired’s Rhett Allain offers his two cents on Khan Academy and shares a video submitted to MTT2K’s contest for Khan Academy video critiques. (Read about MTT2K as covered in Technapex.)

“The Side of Online Education No One’s Talking About: The Downside”
Higher ed journalist Lauren Landry addresses the tough questions online education raises. Some teasers: “The popularity of online learning has been proven, but is popularity really enough? Is popularity what can kill the MBA, replace traditional education or force community colleges to start quivering in their much smaller, increasingly expensive boots?”

“Why the Online-Education Craze Will Leave Many Students Behind”
Associate professor at Cornell University Noliwe M. Rooks posts to Time’s Ideas blog, also addressing some of the problems online education presents. “I am concerned,” Rooks writes, “that computer-aided instruction will actually widen the gap between the financially and educationally privileged and everyone else, instead of close it.”

“Technology in Education: We’re not there yet, but companies can help”
Virglilia Singh posts to TNW’s Insider blog, highlighting large corporations who are investing their technological resources into organizations that will enable them to teach their youth core STEM principles.

“EdTech Solutions at the 2012 Imagine Cup”
Daniel Donahoo posts to HuffPost’s education blog about this year’s Imagine Cup, where students from across the globe develop and present a range of technology-based solutions to the world’s problems.

“Blended Learning: Education beyond the classroom”
No, blended learning has nothing to do with mixology classes. If you’re still unclear on the concept, check out Ime Morales’ post to Rappler, in which she presents an example of blended learning in the Philippines.

Caity Doyle

Caity is a former English teacher and the editor of Technapex. Caity is extremely passionate about education and is TriplePoint PR's resident edtech expert. When not researching education policy and edtech, she enjoys running along the Bay Trail while blaring the Boss through her headphones, watching the Giants beat the Dodgers, and meeting fellow Italians in North Beach.

More Posts

About Caity Doyle

Caity is a former English teacher and the editor of Technapex. Caity is extremely passionate about education and is TriplePoint PR's resident edtech expert. When not researching education policy and edtech, she enjoys running along the Bay Trail while blaring the Boss through her headphones, watching the Giants beat the Dodgers, and meeting fellow Italians in North Beach.