Scott Cook: Technology Revolutionized Entertainment, Education’s Next

Today Forbes posted a video of an interview with founder and chairman of Intuit Scott Cook. The video was taken at last year’s Techonomy conference in Tucson, AZ. The event focuses on the exponential growth of technology and draws entrepreneurs, investors, developers, and other innovators.

In his interview, Cook predicts that technology is going to revolutionize education in the same way it revolutionized the entertainment industry. He makes the point that “In 1900, a great way to die poor was to be an actor, a musician, or a ball player.” He goes on to point out that with the development of technology, entertainers are now some of the wealthiest people in the world because recording and distribution broadcast technology allows the entertainer to be viewed by a worldwide audience. As a result, the quality and quantity of entertainment we have access to is now greater because we’re no longer limited to entertainers who are only  in our immediate vicinity.

Technology can revolutionize education in the same way, he says, by allowing the best educators to be accessible to all students. “I can see a day,” Cook says, “When there are non- and for-profit teachers who become famous just like entertainers, because they are the best in the world teaching what they teach, and they are viewed by people all over the world.”

What do you think of Cook’s theory? Watch his interview below and then sound off in the comments section!

 

Caity Doyle

Caity is a former English teacher and the editor of Technapex. Caity is extremely passionate about education and is TriplePoint PR's resident edtech expert. When not researching education policy and edtech, she enjoys running along the Bay Trail while blaring the Boss through her headphones, watching the Giants beat the Dodgers, and meeting fellow Italians in North Beach.

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About Caity Doyle

Caity is a former English teacher and the editor of Technapex. Caity is extremely passionate about education and is TriplePoint PR's resident edtech expert. When not researching education policy and edtech, she enjoys running along the Bay Trail while blaring the Boss through her headphones, watching the Giants beat the Dodgers, and meeting fellow Italians in North Beach.
  • Patrick

    The flipped classroom is a great approach but I know many educators who also feel this is also removing them from the equation. If a teacher is merely there to coach, discipline and encourage as Mr. Cook suggests then would that lower the bar for the actual classroom teacher?
    There is a balance with technology, teaching, and a teacher that will drive our students toward success.  
    The KEY is finding that balance but Scott Cook is brilliant and this was a great discussion!

  • CC

    I agree Patrick, there absolutely must be a balance. But I don’t think it removes that instructor from the equation, so much as it re-imagines the equation altogether. If anything, the instructor must be MORE prepared to address the curiosity of students who are no longer passively absorbing information that is completely new to them. They will have had time to digest the lesson and, ideally, will come in armed with questions that the instructor had better be ready to answer.