Do Flipped Classrooms Really Work?

While flipped classrooms have become more popular over the past few years, some question whether they are really effective for everyone.

Just think about it for a minute. You’re asking students to learn independently at home before coming to the classroom. In order to be successful, this requires motivated students. Furthermore, many teachers compile electronic materials, including videos and other resources, for students to review at home. But what about students without internet access? This poses a potential challenge.

KQED’s MindShift recently raised the question of whether flipped classrooms benefit low-income students in particular. To read more, visit http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2012/06/can-the-flipped-classroom-benefit-low-income-students/.

Jasmine Redeaux (left) and Nakesha Wilkerson team up to finish a worksheet in a “flipped” chemistry class at their Macon, Ga., high school, while other classmates work on a lab.
Credit: KQED’s MindShift blog