Cultivating Creativity in Education

Today, Joseph Baker posted a wonderful article in Edudemic titled “Layers of Learning: Understanding the Complexity of Student Talent and Academic Success.” In his article, Baker talks about the importance of discovering hidden talents in students in order to cultivate their creativity and cites Sir Ken Robinson’s TED talk, which is embedded below.

The talk is well worth a viewing. In an age of two minute Youtube videos, 200 word blog posts, and 140 character tweets, spending 19 minutes and 29 seconds watching a video can seem daunting, but Robinson is a phenomenal speaker. A cultural leader in education, Robinson makes a wonderful case for cultivating creativity in students, and peppers the talk with plenty of humor and anecdotes to keep you listening.

Favorite quotes:

“I’ve found that everybody has an interest in education. Isn’t that interesting? If you’re at a dinner party and you say you work in education — actually, you’re not often invited to dinner parties if you work in education.”

“If you’re not prepared to be wrong, you’ll never come up with anything original.”

“All kids have tremendous talents and we squander them pretty ruthlessly.”

“Many highly talented, brilliant, creative people think they’re not — because the thing they were good at at school wasn’t valued, or was actually stigmatized.”

“You don’t think of Shakespeare being a child, do you? Shakespeare being seven? He was seven at some point. He was in somebody’s English class, wasn’t he? How annoying would that be?”

Human resources are like natural resources; they’re often buried deep. You have to go looking for them, they’re not just lying around on the surface.

 

Caity Doyle

Caity is a former English teacher and the editor of Technapex. Caity is extremely passionate about education and is TriplePoint PR's resident edtech expert. When not researching education policy and edtech, she enjoys running along the Bay Trail while blaring the Boss through her headphones, watching the Giants beat the Dodgers, and meeting fellow Italians in North Beach.

More Posts

About Caity Doyle

Caity is a former English teacher and the editor of Technapex. Caity is extremely passionate about education and is TriplePoint PR's resident edtech expert. When not researching education policy and edtech, she enjoys running along the Bay Trail while blaring the Boss through her headphones, watching the Giants beat the Dodgers, and meeting fellow Italians in North Beach.