“Learn Now, Lecture Later” Model Emerges

As a teacher I always felt like I was a lousy lecturer, and thus I tried to limit lecture time in class at all costs.

Perhaps my opinion is a bit biased, seeing as I’m generally my harshest critic when it comes to my teaching skills. But still, when certain lessons necessitated a lecture, I always worried that I was droning. I’d get antsy standing behind the podium, so I’d move around the room, make corny jokes and lame puns, and gesticulate wildly with my hands as is my typical Italian compulsion. As a result, I never had many sleepers during lecture but wouldn’t doubt that my students had a sneaking suspicion that I was on something.

That’s why I was very pleased to read this morning’s Wall Street Journal post , which stated that a new CDW-G survey found that teachers and students have begun to shift away from lecture-only classes. CDW-G is a provider of technology solutions to government, education, and heathcare customers, and the company’s survey reveals that both teachers and students are ready for a change. According to the report, 47 percent of teachers are moving beyond the lecture-only model in the interest of incorporating different learning models such as hands-on and group projects, independent study, virtual learning and one-on-one tutoring.

The survey of more than 1,000 high school and college students, teachers, and IT professionals revealed that 71 percent of students and 77 percent of teachers say they are using more classroom classroom technology than just two years ago. In incorporating different learning models, students who are not as successful in learning through lecture are given different opportunities to learn new information. Vice president of higher education at CDW-G  Andy Lausch said, “Students told us they want more interaction with teachers during class, as well as the opportunity to incorporate more technology into their classes. In fact, students who are very satisfied with how their teachers use class time also use more technology in class with all types of learning models.”

The only problem is, 88 percent of educators surveyed reported challenges to making the shift citing reasons such as lack of budget, lack of access to technology, lack of professional development, class size, and lack of time.

I certainly understand a lot of these reasons, and know there can be  hurdles in implementing new learning models and technology in the classroom. But with all the OER materials and social networks that are available for teachers in this day and age, lack of resources, time, and ideas seem a poor excuse. I think it’s more possible than ever for teachers to be informed of all the resources that are available to them. Exploring new learning models is a hot topic in education technology right now, and educators need to keep the conversation going so they can find out what works and what doesn’t.

I believe the rate of corny jokes and lame puns that are made by lecturing teachers will be largely reduced as a result.

Caity Doyle

Caity is a former English teacher and the editor of Technapex. Caity is extremely passionate about education and is TriplePoint PR's resident edtech expert. When not researching education policy and edtech, she enjoys running along the Bay Trail while blaring the Boss through her headphones, watching the Giants beat the Dodgers, and meeting fellow Italians in North Beach.

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About Caity Doyle

Caity is a former English teacher and the editor of Technapex. Caity is extremely passionate about education and is TriplePoint PR's resident edtech expert. When not researching education policy and edtech, she enjoys running along the Bay Trail while blaring the Boss through her headphones, watching the Giants beat the Dodgers, and meeting fellow Italians in North Beach.